Press

The Denver Post The Know

Aspen’s Zocalito Latin Bistro moves to Denver, and brings its rare Oaxacan peppers with it.

Michael Beary loves peppers with the intensity that most people save for other people, pets or, well, the finished edible product of those peppers…

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The Westword Magazine

Aspen Chef Is Moving Zocalito to Denver

He'll bring Zocalito, which specializes in cooking with rare chiles and other ingredients from Oaxaca, to 998 18th Street in the Denver Place downtown…

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Denver Eater

Zocalito Latin Bistro Relocates From Aspen to Downtown Denver

After 14 years in Aspen, Michael Beary will bring his Oaxacan restaurant, Zocalito Latin Bistro, to Denver at 999 18th Street…

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5280 Magazine

Aspen’s Beloved Zocalito Latin Bistro Is Opening Soon in Denver

Michael Beary is bringing Oaxacan fare and unique chiles to the Central Business District. If you work or live in downtown Denver, you may already know that the restaurant space inside the Denver Place Building (at the corners of Champa and 18th streets) has sat empty since a Baja Fresh Mexican Grill outpost there closed in 2016. The long wait for a new concept is almost through—and well worth it—as chef-owner Michael Beary is just about ready to take over with his formerly Aspen-based Oaxacan restaurant, Zocalito Latin Bistro…

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303 Magazine

ASPEN’S ESTEEMED ZOCALITO IS MOVING TO DENVER

Zocalito, Aspen’s esteemed latin bistro specializing in Oaxacan cuisine, rare chilies and other unique ingredients, will relocate to downtown Denver before 2019. And for anyone who’s a fan of south of the border fare, this move is an exciting one…

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5280 Magazine

5280 – The Denver Magazine

BY KELLY BASTONE MARCH 2014

Aspen chef Michael Beary’s quest to save rare Mexican chiles from extinction.

Aroma is your first clue that Michael Beary’s chile relleno is like nothing you’ve ever experienced—unless you’ve had the good fortune of sharing a Oaxacan abuela’s Easter feast. Rich yet bright and indescribably earthy, the dish’s fragrance turns diners’ heads as it emerges from the kitchen at Zocalito, Beary’s Aspen restaurant. His version features a long, plump “pasilla de Oaxaca”—a pepper that’s seldom available in the United States—bathed in a mole made with even more difficult-to-find ingredients: red, yellow, and black “chilhuacles.” Such chiles are rarer than truffles and just as heady. Indeed, Beary’s impassioned effort to bring them to this country probably ranks as Colorado’s most epic farm-to-table project ever...

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Printed in Aspen Magazine

BY Todd Hartley JUNE 2014

Oaxacan cuisine is traditionally known for its seven types of mole: negro (black), colorado (red), coloradito (reddish-orange), amarillo (yellow), verde (green), chichilo (rich and dark) and manchamantel (“tablecloth stainer”). None of these complex sauces are especially easy to make. If you want to make them authentically, it’s even more difficult. That’s because many of the chile peppers needed to make mole the right way are exceedingly hard to find, even in the Mexican state of Oaxaca.

That’s where chef Michael Beary and his Zocalito Bistro come in. A longtime Roaring Fork Valley resident who also spent a decade in the kitchen at Cache Cache, Beary is described on his website as “doing more than anyone to bring the authentic ingredients and true flavors of Oaxaca to America.” In this case, that’s not just marketing hyperbole—it’s an apt summation.

- See more at: http://modernluxury.com/aspen/articles/pepper-purveyor#sthash.ck65oatH.dpuf

Oaxacan cuisine is traditionally known for its seven types of mole: negro (black), colorado (red), coloradito (reddish-orange), amarillo (yellow), verde (green), chichilo (rich and dark) and manchamantel (“tablecloth stainer”). None of these complex sauces are especially easy to make. If you want to make them authentically, it’s even more difficult. That’s because many of the chile peppers needed to make mole the right way are exceedingly hard to find, even in the Mexican state of Oaxaca.

That’s where chef Michael Beary and his Zocalito Bistro come in. A longtime Roaring Fork Valley resident who also spent a decade in the kitchen at Cache Cache, Beary is described on his website as “doing more than anyone to bring the authentic ingredients and true flavors of Oaxaca to America.” In this case, that’s not just marketing hyperbole—it’s an apt summation.

- See more at: http://modernluxury.com/aspen/articles/pepper-purveyor#sthash.ck65oatH.dpuf

Oaxacan cuisine is traditionally known for its seven types of mole: negro (black), colorado (red), coloradito (reddish-orange), amarillo (yellow), verde (green), chichilo (rich and dark) and manchamantel (“tablecloth stainer”). None of these complex sauces are especially easy to make. If you want to make them authentically, it’s even more difficult. That’s because many of the chile peppers needed to make mole the right way are exceedingly hard to find, even in the Mexican state of Oaxaca.

That’s where chef Michael Beary and his Zocalito Bistro come in. A longtime Roaring Fork Valley resident who also spent a decade in the kitchen at Cache Cache, Beary is described on his website as “doing more than anyone to bring the authentic ingredients and true flavors of Oaxaca to America.” In this case, that’s not just marketing hyperbole—it’s an apt summation.

Read the full story in Aspen Magazine